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My subsequent Encounter with a Lego Kit

Building a World of my Own (I didn't know I had it in me)

By Dr. Randy KaplanPublished 2 months ago 7 min read
Photograph 1 - Photo by the Author. All rights reserved. Do not copy or distribute.

I took it upon myself to see what it was like to create my world. I want to build a world with the desired features that look like a place where I want to live. I can populate this world with the people I want to live there. Influencers need not apply.

Fortunately, the friendly folk at Lego have provided me with a kit to build my own world. For several weeks, the Lego world kit was assembled. Here, I will describe my building experience with the Lego World kit.

So this is my Earth when it was completed. It spins so you can see the other land masses and oceans.

In the beginning, there was a place to put the Earth. We still need Divine powers, so creating space for this project (outer space) would be difficult. Rather than creating outer space, the Lego designers provided a mounting platform to support the globe when world-building is finished.

Photograph 1 - Photo by the Author. All rights reserved. Do not copy or distribute.

When I begin a Lego, my workspace and the parts of the globe are usually in good order.

And then things begin getting messy. Here, the world mounting platform is mainly completed, but as you can see, quite a few parts are still available to complete the mounting platform.

You can also see the parts bags behind the globe mount.

Photograph 3 - Photo by the Author. All rights reserved. Do not copy or distribute.

The next photo shows a slightly rotated view of the globe mount.

Photograph 4 - Photo by the Author. All rights reserved. Do not copy or distribute.

Photograph 5 - Photo by the Author. All rights reserved. Do not copy or distribute.

When fully built, the world will be held by two pins in this semicircular mount. One of these is at the northern tip of the Earth in the Arctic Circle. The second point where the globe is attached to the mounting platform is Antarctica, at the center of that part of the globe.

With over two thousand parts, having the parts in plastic bags makes assembling the globe a more manageable task. The assembly instructions specify which bag to use as you progress through the assembly.

After the mounting is assembled, the central ring is assembled. It contains the holes for the red pins at the bottom of each panel. The two pins on the bottom of each panel are inserted into holes in brown bricks attached to each panel.

See if you can locate the fifth, seventh, thirteenth, and fourth part bags in Photograph 4.

You will also notice some interesting features on the globe's interior attached to the central ring. One of those is the tires connected to a strut held by the column in the globe's center. The tires are part of the strengthening structure of the world. Although you can't see them, a matching pair of wheels is on the other side of the globe.

I also wanted to highlight the upper panels and their connection to the green ring at the globe's top. Notice that a small claw attaches each panel to the green ring.

It's Time to Assemble Hemispheres

Building the globe is where most of the time will be spent building the world. The globe's surface comprises 32 panels — 16 constituting the top half of the world and 16 panels making up the bottom half or southern hemisphere.

The next photo shows the contents of the package of parts needed to assemble four panels.

Photograph 6 - Photo by the Author. All rights reserved. Do not copy or distribute.

These are the parts needed to assemble four of the panels. Although I didn't know this about the parts, some can be identified as similar to the parts or subassemblies used in other LEGO kits. The assembly methods may also be comparable to other Lego kits.

The red pins secure the base of each panel to the globe.

Photograph 7 - Photo by the Author. All rights reserved. Do not copy or distribute.

In the next photo, the small pile of green and beige parts will be used to create land masses, areas of plant growth, and plaques for each continent.

Here is another view of the assembled panels with those pieces I just described.

Photograph 8 - Photo by the Author. All rights reserved. Do not copy or distribute.

Each panel of the globe represents 1/16th of the total surface area of the northern or southern hemisphere of the world. Thirty-two panels will be assembled to complete the surface of the globe. There is quite a bit of repetition during the assembly of the panels.

A panel is held by inserting the red pin at the bottom of a panel Into a connector on the equator, while the top of each panel is held by a claw that connects to a ring at the top of the globe, as shown earlier in a previous photo.

Photograph 9 - Photo by the Author. All rights reserved. Do not copy or distribute.

Here is what a typical page in the assembly instructions looks like. This assembly manual page is typical of Lego building instructions.

Photograph 10 - Photo by the Author. All rights reserved. Do not copy or distribute.

As you can see in the photo below, we are looking at the globe's interior. The silver tube/screw mechanism is to keep the panels from collapsing inward. When completed, four of these internal supports will be provided for each quarter of the globe.

Photograph 11 - Photo by the Author. All rights reserved. Do not copy or distribute.

Below, you can see another view inside the Earth, where tensioners are attached to wheels with tires. These are also part of how the Lego Earth has been constructed to maintain the shape of the panels.

The next photo shows the parts inside the globe that attach each panel to the world. The gray claws extending from the green ring surrounding the white brick show the claws attached to each panel. The photo shows how the panels are connected to the globe structure.

Here is an enlarged view of the claws attached to the globe's center with the claws.

Photograph 12 - Photo by the Author. All rights reserved. Do not copy or distribute.

The white brick at the center of the green ring has a hole going through it. This hole is where a pin coming from the mounting is inserted.

Photograph 13 - Photo by the Author. All rights reserved. Do not copy or distribute.

The next photo shows how the pin secures the globe to the mounting platform.

Photograph 14 - Photo by the Author. All rights reserved. Do not copy or distribute.

Photograph 15 - Photo by the Author. All rights reserved. Do not copy or distribute.

Photograph 16 - Photo by the Author. All rights reserved. Do not copy or distribute.

If you look at the mount and its relation to the globe, you will notice that the space between the world and the mount varies from the top to the bottom of the mounting platform. Along the curve of the mount, you can see that the globe touches the mount. When the space between the world and the mount becomes small, the globe cannot spin freely. When it was spun, parts of the mount flew away from the world. The bottom and top pins and the connections to the mount did not come away from the globe, so the world did not detach from the mount.

After I examined the mount and the parts that popped off when the mount exploded, I found that some of the mount sub-structures were incorrectly assembled. After some time, I determined my errors when making the mounting platform. After fixing the mounting platform, when I spun the globe, it spun smoothly, and no part became entangled with the mounting platform, which would cause the world to be damaged.

One other comment made in the reviews was that the build was fragile. No, I don't think so. Did it fall apart while I handled it? No, I didn't know it would. The globe felt sturdy.

The Globe was Finished — What do I think? What do you think?

I just read some reviews of the kit from around the web. Many were positive. Very few of the comments were adverse. The main complaint is a lot of repetition when building the globe. That is true. My daughter and I are building the Lego Typewriter kit now, and that build has a lot of repetition.

One of the more exciting aspects of Lego builds is that many of the kits are repetitious. I purchased the Lego Eiffel Tower kit. When assembled, the resulting model of the Eiffel Tower will be almost the height of an adult, and I suspect there will also be repetition in that kit.

Many architectural buildings consist of large areas of repetitive construction. Think about the pyramids and how they are constructed of many similar interlocking blocks. Seeing patterns in things is one of the aspects of buildings and other objects that people enjoy. Predictability and symmetry are characteristics that people also appreciate. Look at the Lego World from that perspective.

The Earth kit is genuinely something to behold. People will look at it and say WOW, you built that? or some similar comment. Two thousand five hundred eighty-five pieces assembled into a world globe. Just think about that. That is an impressive fact. There is joy in building it and joy in looking at it. Don't downplay that. It is worth thinking about.

Was the globe worth building? My answer is a resounding yes.

Would I recommend this kit? Yes, I would.

Were there any missing parts? Yes, there were a total of three. I called Lego about those parts, and they sent them.

How were the instructions? The assembly instructions were clear and straightforward, and the drawings were done well. I couldn't tell where the arrows ended up in a couple of cases, and there was no "rear" view, which proved a challenge.

Given the number of pieces, this kit would be fun to build with another person.

There was a comment in one of the reviews that the surface parts used for land masses should be able to be pinned. It is possible to cut some small pieces of foam and attach a piece of foam to a surface location on the globe. Put a small pin into the foam. It is better to use a rigid foam and paint it the color of the land mass.

It's always fun to think about other modifications that would make the globe more interesting if you felt it was necessary.

Mount some small pinpoint bulbs to the land masses and have those bulbs light up with the press of a button.

I forgot to mention that the land mass plaques glow after being exposed to light for a while. It is a nice touch.

What's My Next Build?

My daughter and I are building the typewriter kit, which will probably be the next kit I will write about. Some interesting kits waiting to be built include The Pyramid, A traditional British telephone booth, and a pirate island.

Happy building.

Please tell me your thoughts about this build and whether it interests you. I'd like to hear if you built the globe yourself. Is it a build that you want to do?

Note: No part of this article was written by an AI. We maintain an AI-free environment. Any errors in this article are my fault and the fault of some hallucinating. If you do detect any hallucinations, they are my own and have not been collected by any AI or for that matter have been plagiarized by any AI without the permission of the creator.

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About the Creator

Dr. Randy Kaplan

Welcome to my Vocal page and storicles that are published here. I write about tech, the human condition, and anything else that interests me.

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