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4 Superstitions and Myths About Mirrors

by Sunshine Jane 10 months ago in advice
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Are you superstitious?

4 Superstitions and Myths About Mirrors
Photo by Barthelemy de Mazenod on Unsplash

Have you ever wondered if mirrors cause bad luck? In this article, we expose the myths and superstitions of mirrors, from Bloody Mary to broken mirrors.

Bloody Mary: A Dangerous "Truth or Challenge" Game

The game "Truth or Challenge" has been around for some time, but have you ever been challenged to summon a ghost?

This folk ritual claims that if you light a candle in a dimly lit room and recite "Bloody Mary" 3 times in a mirror, you will see a woman covered in blood in reflection.

Legend has it that she may scream or even go through the mirror and wrap her cold hands around your neck.

The origin of the myth of broken mirrors

According to legend, when you break a mirror, you will be cursed for bad luck for the next 7 years. How true is this myth? How is the curse canceled?

Although it is difficult to say how accurate this belief is, it is always better to be cautious than sorry. Accidents happen and things break - we are human.

If you are looking for an unbreakable mirror (or at least one that is slightly less prone to breakage), using an acrylic mirror is ideal.

Acrylic is made of polymers of methyl methacrylate, which makes it essentially a reactive resin. It is flexible, lightweight, and has amazing impact resistance.

There are several potential options for reversing the curse:

  • Wait a few hours before picking up the broken fragments, then gather them to the last piece of the mirror and bury them out in the moonlight.
  • Throw salt over your left shoulder.
  • Take a single piece of the mirror and touch it with a tombstone.

Gift mirrors for newlyweds

If you or someone you know is getting married, then you're in luck. The happy couple should sit together in front of a mirror. Not only can they see how amazing they look on their special day, but they also attend a wedding tradition.

It is said that if the married couple looks in a mirror shortly after saying "yes", they unite their souls. When you look in the mirror with someone, it is said that this creates an alternate universe in which the two souls can live together forever.

Another common wedding tradition is a little riskier, but just as much fun. Breaking a bottle on your wedding day is auspicious (just try to avoid mirrors). The broken pieces of glass represent how many years the couple will spend together.

That being said, although looking in the mirror after you get married brings good luck, giving a mirror to newlyweds will not. Asian cultures believe that giving a mirror to a couple on their wedding day will bring bad luck.

This is partly due to the symbolism, as marriages should last forever, and mirrors are very fragile or prone to breakage (unless it is an acrylic mirror). Another reason is that mirrors have the potential to hold back evil spirits.

The origin of the myth of covered mirrors

Covering a mirror after the death of a loved one has its origins in the Kabbalistic tradition. They believe that when a soul leaves this world, it leaves a void. This emptiness allows spirits to enter the world of the living - including the wicked.

Wherever there is an energy vacuum, there is the potential for negative energy to seep through.

Once someone dies, his soul is released from the body and begins to roam.

Legend has it that if a soul encounters a mirror before the body is buried (usually within the first 3 days of passing), their soul will be caught in the mirror. It is said that this causes the mirrors to get dirty or even turn into an image of the deceased.

People claimed to see the faces of the dead appearing in the ancient mirrors. Is this a trapped soul or just our mind playing tricks on us?

Some also believe that demons could escape through the mirror into our world. To prevent trapped souls and demons from wandering, simply keep your mirrors covered when someone dies.

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Sunshine Jane

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