History logo

Cluster of four asteroids to hurtle past Earth on 16 February, 2024

hurtle past Earth on

By Aabusad PathanPublished 5 months ago 3 min read

If the largest of the asteroids were to actually strike the Earth, then it would result in an impact crater measuring 440 metres across. An impact of comparable intensity actually takes place about once every 2,000 years. About 2.5 million people would lose their lives, if such an impact were to take place over a major metro city in India.

On 16 February, 2024, four asteroids are scheduled for a close approach to the Earth. All of the four asteroids were discovered in 2024, and bear the designations 2024 CP5, 2024 CP4, 2024 AO and 2024 CA2.

2024 CP5 measures between 17 and 28 metres across, will be travelling at a velocity of 7.82 kilometres per second, and will approach within 63,58,810 kilometres of the Earth, or less than 17 times the distance between the Earth and the Moon.

2024 CP4 measures between 23 and 51 metres across, will be travelling at a velocity of 11.61 kilometres per second, and will approach within 21,68,769 kilometres of the Earth, or less than six times the distance between the Earth and the Moon.

2024 AO measures between 38 and 86 metres across, will be travelling at a velocity of 7.28 kilometres per second, and will approach within 35,46,386 kilometres of the Earth, or less than ten times the distance between the Earth and the Moon.

2024 CA2 measures between 36 and 81 metres across, will be travelling at a velocity of 10.74 kilometres per second, and will approach within 45,01,715 kilometres of the Earth, or less than 12 times the distance between the Earth and the Moon.

Most of the asteroids in the Solar System occupy the main belt between Mars and Jupiter. However, there are populations of asteroids distributed throughout the Solar System. 2024 CP5 belongs to a group of asteroids that cross the Earth, but have orbits that are larger than that of the Earth, but smaller than that of Mars, known as Amors. Both 2024 CP4 and 2024 AO belong to a group of asteroids known as Apollos, that have orbits larger than that of the Earth. Both Amors and Apollos make close approaches to Earth and Mars. Finally, 2024 CA2 belongs to a group known as Atens, that have orbits smaller than that of the Earth, but ones that intersect with Earth’s path around the Sun. These asteroids frequently make close approaches to both Venus and Earth.

On February 16, 2024, Earth will have a close encounter with a cluster of four asteroids. These space rocks will zoom past our planet at a distance that's relatively close in astronomical terms. While the idea of asteroids whizzing by might sound alarming, there's no need to panic.

Firstly, these asteroids are not on a collision course with Earth. They will pass by safely, posing no threat to our planet. Scientists have been tracking their movements closely and have determined that they will remain at a safe distance.

However, these encounters serve as a reminder of the potential dangers lurking in space. Asteroids are remnants from the formation of the solar system and occasionally, their orbits bring them close to Earth. Understanding their paths and characteristics is crucial for planetary defense efforts.

Fortunately, events like these also present valuable opportunities for scientists to study asteroids up close. By observing their size, shape, and composition, researchers can learn more about the origins of our solar system and develop strategies for potential asteroid mitigation in the future.

So, while the sight of asteroids passing by might be a spectacle, rest assured that Earth is in no immediate danger. Our scientists are keeping a watchful eye on the skies to ensure our safety in the vastness of space.

ResearchWorld History

About the Creator

Enjoyed the story?
Support the Creator.

Subscribe for free to receive all their stories in your feed. You could also pledge your support or give them a one-off tip, letting them know you appreciate their work.

Subscribe For Free

Reader insights

Be the first to share your insights about this piece.

How does it work?

Add your insights

Comments

There are no comments for this story

Be the first to respond and start the conversation.

    APWritten by Aabusad Pathan

    Find us on social media

    Miscellaneous links

    • Explore
    • Contact
    • Privacy Policy
    • Terms of Use
    • Support

    © 2024 Creatd, Inc. All Rights Reserved.