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The history of Cabo Verde

by Abena 5 months ago in Historical / Historical
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The islands of Cabo Verde were first discovered by the Portuguese in 1456.

The history of Cabo Verde
Photo by Belinda Fewings on Unsplash

The islands of Cabo Verde may have been populated as early as the 10th century. The first settlers were most likely those who lived on the islands beginning in the 15th century, and then those from So Tiago Island (where they became known as). Slaves from present-day Senegal and Guinea came to live in Cabo Verde as well.

Most of the first inhabitants were descendants of people from several places in Africa, India, and Portugal who settled on the island during the 16th century. These first inhabitants lived peacefully with one another for many years, though they were often viewed by Portuguese sailors as being lazy. The first written record appeared in 1456, when Portuguese explorer Diogo Gomes called the islands Cabo Verde, meaning "green cape."

The islands of Cabo Verde were first discovered by the Portuguese in 1456. At first, the islands were known as the Ilhas dos Cabo Verdes, or "Islands of the Green Cape." The name was given to them by the Portuguese explorer Diogo Gomes.

The first inhabitants of the islands were Europeans, people from Portugal and Africa, as well as certain native peoples. The majority of these people were part of a crew that was on its way to what is now Brazil. Slave traders brought Africans to work on sugar plantations in one of the first European colonies in the Americas.

The first recorded inhabitants of the islands were Europeans: people from Portugal and Africa, as well as certain native peoples. The majority of these people were part of a crew that was on its way to what is now Brazil. Slave traders brought Africans to work on sugar plantations in one of the first European colonies in the Americas.

The first recorded inhabitants of the islands were Europeans: people from Portugal and Africa, as well as certain native peoples. The majority of these people were part of a crew that was on its way to what is now Brazil. Slave traders brought Africans to work on sugar plantations in one of the first European colonies in the Americas.

In the 16 th century, the islands became a port for Portuguese ships traveling from Europe to "Terra da Trindade," or what is now Brazil. The Portuguese started trading with the Africans on the mainland, and later with other Europeans. By 1580, nearly 250 years after Cabo Verde was first visited by Portuguese sailors, the total value of all Portuguese ships traveling to and from Africa was about $2.5 million.

In 1580, nearly 250 years after Cabo Verde was first visited by Portuguese sailors, the total value of all Portuguese ships traveling to and from Africa was about $2.5 million.

Cabo Verde eventually became a stopover point for ships carrying slaves from West Africa to the Americas. The Portuguese started trading with the Africans on the mainland and later with other Europeans. By 1580, nearly 250 years after Cabo Verde was first visited by Portuguese sailors, the total value of all Portuguese ships traveling to and from Africa was about $2.5 million.

In 1580, nearly 250 years after Cabo Verde was first visited by Portuguese sailors, the total value of all Portuguese ships traveling to and from Africa was about $2.5 million. This trade continued until the late 1800s, when slavery was abolished.

During the 1800s, many people from Europe and the United States came to the islands for their vacations.

The Atlantic slave trade brought many people of different nationalities into Cabo Verde, who then stayed there or moved on to other Portuguese colonies in South America. Europeans often married native African women, which caused a small mixed African population . While the majority of the people were Catholic , some groups followed Protestantism or Islam .

During the 1800s, many people from Europe and the United States came to the islands for their vacations. This trade continued until the late 1800s, when slavery was abolished.

By 1914, about one-third of all Cabo Verdians were Creole (meaning they had both European and African ancestry). Some intermarried with white people, so the majority of the population was not black.

During World War II, Portugal was officially neutral but allowed Nazi Germany to move troops via Cabo Verde. The United States also sent troops to prepare for events that would later be known as World War II.

In 1952, the islands were given an administrative status separate from mainland Portugal, and Cabo Verde became an overseas province.

In the 1960s, the economy grew rapidly due to industrialization and growth in its tourism industry. Because of this, almost all of the nation's modern buildings can be found here.

Today, Cape Verde is an important stop on the way from Europe to South America. The country is also a popular tourist destination, with its mixture of African and Portuguese culture and history.

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Abena

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