Staff Picks

  • Victoria Cochran
    Published 2 years ago
    Child Poverty in the UK

    Child Poverty in the UK

    “I think there is something to be said for the argument that there is a section of youth in this country that do not feel they have a legitimate future, who have been raised in poverty, who in a sense are completely marginalized and isolated from the rest of society, and who feel they have no power over their own lives.” - Owen Jones, ‘Chavs: The Demonization of the Working Class’
  • Clare Novell
    Published 2 years ago
    University Survival Guide: Part 1 - Living in Halls/Student Housing

    University Survival Guide: Part 1 - Living in Halls/Student Housing

    As a third year student about to graduate, I am becoming increasingly aware of how naive and unaware I was of how to prepare for university life when I first started. Thus begins my multi-chapter survival guide for university.
  • Joe Chessher
    Published 2 years ago
    Student Leadership #001
  • Olivia Amber
    Published 2 years ago
    Highly Successful Billionaires That Didn't Finish College

    Highly Successful Billionaires That Didn't Finish College

    Some of the most wealthy and successful billionaires that didn't finish college might shock you. With people worth upwards of $60 billion, each of these billionaires have dropped out of at least one college, maybe even three, or simply did not take the higher education route.
  • Sugar CreekWriter
    Published 2 years ago
    I'm Quitting Homeschooling My Kids. There, I Said It.

    I'm Quitting Homeschooling My Kids. There, I Said It.

    I'm sitting here tonight while my four kids play with Legos and chat about our new goat, Moonpie, who is coming to live with us in two days. There's an occasional shriek as one kid snatches a block from another or accidentally knocks a tower over but more often there are shrieks of laughter. These kids are my whole world. I absolutely love them and work so hard to give them all the best. But right now, homeschooling isn't part of "the best".
  • Adam Sandone
    Published 2 years ago
    Studying Abroad the Right Way

    Studying Abroad the Right Way

    As a college student, it's likely that you'll encounter many professors, advisors, etc. who will tell you to study abroad. Maybe you've seen flyers around your campus, or your friends' Instagram posts in front of the Eiffel Tower or a different location every weekend and thought it looked like a lot of fun. It is, and you should absolutely do it. In the fall of 2016, I left for England. I had lived in Connecticut my entire life. And not the part of Connecticut that's so close to New York you can spend the afternoon in the city and be home for dinner, but the middle, so unidentifiable that there isn't even a stereotype to use to make fun of it. So when I got to England it was immediately different, but it didn't take long to settle in. In England you get your own room in a flat, which means you don't have a roommate but you share a kitchen and bathroom with three to five other people, no matter the gender. So already, you've got people to pass the time with, and if you want your alone time, you've got it. I went over with two of my friends, so I was lucky enough to have them too. I was only supposed to stay for one semester, which had me flying back home two days before classes in Connecticut started, but a month in, I was already messaging my home university about extending it further. And after the spring term was almost finished, I was messaging about staying for one last semester in the fall. During my nearly year and a half abroad, I met lots of Americans who chose to use their time abroad in different ways. Some of them found other like-minded Americans and traveled every weekend, and some of them fell in with the Brits and got to know the ins and outs of their temporary home a little bit better. Some people even chose to do a little of both. No matter how you choose to spend your time abroad, there are some things I'd like to share that you will not find on a school brochure.
  • Haley Peterson
    Published 2 years ago
    Start Your Day as a Substitute Teacher the Right Way

    Start Your Day as a Substitute Teacher the Right Way

    Being a substitute teacher is hard work. As a former full-time elementary school teacher, I was reminded of just how hard it can be to teach a class that isn't your own when I transitioned from teaching full time to becoming a stay at home mom and subbing part time. As a teacher, I had excellent classroom management skills. I think most of this was because I built relationships with my students. As a sub, I don't have time to build those relationships, so it is essential to start the day off on the right foot. Here are a few ways to start the day positively as a substitute teacher.
  • Sebastian Phillips
    Published 2 years ago
    Seven Things That Stop Teachers from Leaving Their Jobs (And How to Overcome Them)

    Seven Things That Stop Teachers from Leaving Their Jobs (And How to Overcome Them)

    I've talked to a lot of disillusioned teachers. They want to quit but they can't, for various reasons. In this article, I'm going to run through some of those and give some handy hints to those who really can't face the classroom any more, but are stopped by these key things:
  • Chrissy P
    Published 2 years ago
    Ways to Help Your Child Succeed in School

    Ways to Help Your Child Succeed in School

    Parents have a decision in their child's education. While it is true, some parents have fewer choices but there are always decisions that will guide your child to success. Here are a few ideas to boost this success. You do not have to do them all to see success and the idea can be changed as it will work for your family unit.