9 Tips for Studying Online

If you find yourself unable to focus on your classwork and are looking for ways to improve your study discipline, here are a few ways to get started.

9 Tips for Studying Online
Photo by XPS on Unsplash

Studying is important, but it can get tedious if you approach it in the wrong way. Proper studying habits can indeed go a long way when it comes to learning what you are expected to learn in an effective way, but many students have trouble figuring out how, exactly, to approach studying. If you find yourself unable to focus on your classwork and are looking for ways to improve your study discipline, here are a few ways to get started.

Choose the program that's right for you

The first step is to make sure that you choose a program that will not only suit your educational needs but inspire you as well. Nurses, for example, are passionate about what they are studying which can help tremendously when it comes to staying focused. If you are taking online nursing classes from Marian Nursing School, take time between the full time or part-time coursework to think about what the job you want does for you as a career professional and how you can find fulfillment in your work.

Maintain a well-organized space

Keeping all of the essentials necessary for a productive study session on hand is helpful so you can get the most out of your time. Remove distractions, keep study materials like flashcards around, and make sure all of your notes are compiled and easy to access. If your internet connection is a potential issue, you may also find it worth your time to compare internet plans with iSelect so you can count on a reliable connection with which to study.

Don't cram at the last minute

Last-minute studying isn't recommended for long-term retention. Also, sleep deprivation is a major problem for students trying to finish all of their work on little sleep because it causes problems while the student is recovering from their all-nighter.

Set goals

Setting goals for yourself is a good way to measure progress. Not only does this allow you to look at your academic career with a sense of progression, but reaping the benefits from seeing that progression can help you stay confident when studying in the future. Try learning the wildly popular SMART goal system.

Take notes

Having exact, accurate notes from the class and readings will help while studying. When taking notes during a lecture, make sure to read them back to yourself after the lecture, and perhaps put them in a format more useful for studying later, such as flashcards.

Make a study plan

Set a schedule for yourself so you can get into a habit of studying on a regular basis. Just as bad habits are difficult to break, good habits can help you stay on task when the going gets tough.

Talk to other students

Learning new information can be difficult, but you don't have to do it alone. Talking to other students could very well give you insight into concepts from your lectures or readings that you may not have understood. Study groups on campus or at the local library may also help if you are still looking through internet plans because your home internet can't stream video reliably.

Don't neglect your health

Your overall health will ultimately affect how well you absorb and process the information needed to pass your classes, not to mention its effect on your general quality of life. Between low-cost food and poor sleep schedules, it is all too easy to forget that your own health is a valuable career asset worth maintaining.

Ask questions

The teacher is going to be one of the most crucial resources available for the class. If they have office hours, you should attend as often as you can and prepare questions to bring along with you. If you can't make time to go, you should try sending your professor a question or two via email. Professors are often busy, but many are willing to share information that may be useful for the most recent assignments.

Studying using resources found online can be extremely helpful, but knowing what you need to learn is only the first step. Self-discipline is a key part of learning, but do not be discouraged if you find that you cannot focus on the task at hand as much as you would like. Instead, consider what you might need to do to stay on track and never lose sight of what motivated you to pursue your studies in the first place.

how to
Read next: The Unconventional College Life
Carlos Fox
See all posts by Carlos Fox