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I am a thrill seeker and am always in the lookout for great trails and peaks that offer breathtaking views. Traveling is a passion and I am grateful to have wandered for so long and meet some amazing people along the way.

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    Published 8 months ago
    Adam Bede

    Adam Bede

    Diana Morris, a Methodist evangelist, arrives in Heslop, a little town in Britain, in 1799. She lives with her close relative and uncle, Mr. and Mrs. Fraud, although she plans to return to the field before long, where she often dwells. Seth Bede, a nearby carpenter, adores her and loves to live with her, even offering to marry her. Seth's brother, Adam Bed, too lives in Heslop and works as a foreman at a carpentry workshop where he and his brother work. Adam adores the magnificence of a 17-year-old town girl called Haiti Tawny. Haiti, who is Mr. Poisser's nephew, lives with Balane and helps as much as she can with family chores. Seth and Adam's father, after drinking wine, suffocate in a waterway close to his home His mother, although, is disturbed. The neighborhood proprietor, Square Dona thorn, controls the area with a press clench hand. His grandson and beneficiary, Captain Donatorn, a part of the Regiment Armed force, broke his arm and lived with the squire. All the villagers regard and adore Captain Donatorn, who considers himself a courageous man. Captain Donaturon furtively teases with Haiti and begins with the assembly with Pazers. He inquires her when she will come to the squire's home, and when she passes, she oversees to be alone within the woods. When Captain Donnithorne meets Haiti within the woods, they are alone for the first time, and both are calm. Captain Donnithorne prods Haiti his numerous books, and he sobs. He puts his weapon around him, but he at that point rapidly startles and escapes with the insufficiency of his advance. Afterward, Captain Denithorn realized what he had done and chosen that Hetty had to see what had happened. He meets her on the way through the timberland and kisses her. The experience starts within the long summer and ends when Captain Donitone has cleared out to rejoin his regiment. Hetty accepts Captain Donissone will wed her and connect the brilliant society he dreams of. She doesn't cherish him at all but adores the riches and benefits that she would be entitled to when she marries him. Captain Donnithorne has a grown-up party and welcomes all individuals to the parish. Everyone comes and they all have an incredible time with feasts and diversions. Adam learned that Hettie was wearing a rocket that Captain Donnythorne gave him. She suspects that there is a mystery woman but concludes that it is outlandish to cover up such things from Poyer. Adam answered that he had to type in a letter to Hetty to let her know that the matter was over. Captain Donnithorne does so and Adam conveys the letter. Hetty is smashed, but after a while, she decides to wed Adam in order to get out of her current life. Adam offers and Hetty acknowledges. When Captain Donnithorne clears out, Hetty is pregnant, but neither of them know it. She chooses to try to find Captain Donnithorne since she cannot bear to find her disgrace for those who know her. She accepts Captain Donnithorne will help her, indeed if she feels that he will never be able to move completely away from the other woman. Hetty sets out to find Captain Donnithorne. After a challenging journey, she learns that he cleared out for Ireland. She heads to the house, with the purpose of going to Dinah, who, agreeing to her, will help her without judging her. Along the way, she gives birth to her child. Anguished, she takes the boy to the woods and buries him beneath a tree. Hetty takes off but cannot elude the sound of the boy crying.
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    Published 8 months ago
    Alas, Babylon

    Alas, Babylon

    As the Cold War was approaching between the Alliance and the Soviet Union, a Constrain officer, Stamp Bragg, cautioned his brother, Randy, that the atomic war was close. Stamp, who lives in Ohio, sends his spouse Helen and their children, Ben Franklin and Patten, to live with Randy in Florida's forlorn city. While they anticipate their entry, Randy cautions his neighbors, Henry and his companions, counting his sweetheart Gover. He began stocking up on nourishment and picked up Helen and her children at the air terminal, as the radio said pressures between the two superpowers were rising. The following morning, the war started, and atomic weapons annihilated all of Florida's major cities. Washington was annihilated, as well, and the current president became the lowest-ranking president within the cabinet. After losing all of its control and communication with the rest of the nation, Fort Ripos was totally disconnected. There's clutter within the little town. Randy's best companion, neighbor Wear Gunn, is beaten by addicts who seeking drugs from his clinic. A neighborhood police chief is murdered; Bank President Edgar Quisenberry kills himself. But Randy and his companions, all come to their home on Waterway Street at one time, oversee to preserve and keep up a kind of order in their lives. Randy gives clean water to his home and neighbors, and Henry cultivates various foods nearby a stream. Don continues to travel around the city to see patients and do the finest he can with constrained restorative care. The emergency emerges when numerous individuals realize that they are enduring from radiation harming caused by all the firing and bombings. Don and Randy are taking care of the emergency together. He collects gems and buries them in a lead-cased box with Porky Logan's body. When the townspeople deny burying the coffin, Randy waves the weapon and demands on doing it. Randy's specialty within the city is certainly regarded. A radio declaration broadcasts that previous Armed Officers ought to be capable for military law in remote locations, and Randy was one of those officers. In this manner, he distributed the proclaim and got to make decisions relating to law authorization. The same evening that he and Rib hitched, he assembled and chased a bunch of outlaws when they assaulted Dangan and pitilessly beat him. He and his companions slaughtered three outlaws and cut another, on the off chance that their neighbor Malachay Henry was shot dead. Cities battle amid the summer to outlive deficiencies. Randy tackles the emergency of salt deficiency. He combs the journal of the precursor who founded the city and finds a reference to an adjacent pool full of salt. Within a short time, government planes flew over the city and Randy's troopers and companions including Paul Hart along with helicopters, landed. He tells them that the nation is still attempting to restore fundamental administrations which it may be centuries or as soon as the sullied regions are cleaned up. It moreover confirms that Stamp kicked the bucket within the war, which implies that Pat Frank's choice not to incorporate dates in any of the occasions he portrays is one way of recommending that these occasions may happen in any minute. Be as it may, the story clearly unfurls in 1960, when the Cold War between the States and the Soviet Union was in full swing. There are references to the emergencies of 1957 and 58, which included a coup d’état in Iraq, an endeavor by the Soviet Union to square West Berlin, a US attack of Lebanon, and Soviet suppression in Hungary. All in all, there were many events happening at the same time.
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    Published 8 months ago
    Timaeus of Locri

    Timaeus of Locri

    Timaeus of Locri is a hero in Timaeus and Critias, two of Plato's dialogues. In both he seems to be a Pythagorean school philosopher. If a historical Timaeus of Locri ever existed, he might have flourished in the fifth century BC, but his historicity is uncertain as he exists only as a literary character in Plato; all other ancient sources are either based on Plato or are fictitious accounts. Throughout Plato's plays, Timaeus emerges as a rich aristocrat from Lokroi Epizephyrioi's Greek colonies, who had worked in high offices in his native town before moving to Athens, where Timaeus 'dialogue is being held. Plato does not specifically mark Timaeus a Pythagorean, but provides the reader with enough clues to conclude that. He appears competent in all fields of ancient philosophy, especially astronomy and natural philosophy. Historical presence of Timaeus in the antiquity was without doubt. Cicero states that Plato was travelling with Timaeus and other Pythagoreans to Italy to study. The account of this encounter prompted Macrobius, a late antiquity scholar, to believe that Timaeus may not have been in a face-to-face conversation with Socrates, who had been long dead by the time of Timaeus. Iamblichus mentions Timaeus among the Pythagorean school's most notable leaders. In his Lives and Thoughts of Eminent Thinkers, Diogenes Laërtius indicates that Timaeus 'character was founded upon the Pythagorean Philolaus. Specific parallels to Timaeus can be found in Proclus, Commentary on Plato's Timaeus; in Simplicius 'essay on Aristotle; and in Porphyry, where Timaeus discusses Pythagoras's house at Croton. Recent scholarship appears to throw off the historicity of Timaeus, viewing him as a fictional character created by Plato from characteristics known to him by the Pythagoreans, such as Archytas. The primary explanation for granting Timaeus the status of a literary novel is the lack of any knowledge that actually may not derive from Plato's dialogues. This has been pointed out as a counterargument that the bulk of characters mentioned in Plato's dialogues are in fact historical individuals. A work in Doric Greek entitled On the Origin of the Earth and the Soul, also named Timaeus Locrus after its supposed creator, begins by claiming that Locri's Timaeus claimed the following and goes on to summarise the ideas that Timaeus supports in Timaeus's Plato. The novel has been thoroughly preserved, in over fifty copies. This is largely in line with Plato; this omits the Theory of Forms in particular. On the earth and the soul was first mentioned in the second century AD sources and in antiquity its authenticity was not questioned. The novel was also believed to have been a significant source of dialogue for Plato; a legend going back to the third century BC claimed that Plato's Timaeus was plagiarised from a Pythagorean text, and this was associated with the Timaeus Locrus. Modern philology has shown that On the Earth and the Soul is a pseudepigraph from sometime from the early 1st century BC to the early 1st century AD and is based on Plato's Timaeus, rather than the other way around. The Pseudo-Timaeus uses a condensed method of logic and analysis, offering conclusions rather than arguments and omitting any dialogue, suggesting that perhaps it was meant as a description of the famously complicated original for use in a classroom context. While it may have emerged in part as a series of lecture notes to the original Platonic, it appears to omit difficult parts of the Timaeus rather than include explanations. Without knowledge of Plato's work, some of Pseudo-Timaeus 'theses are very hard to grasp. On the Earth and the Soul contains traces of middle Platonist theories and terminology; in fact, it parallels works by Eudorus of Alexandria and Philo, making it possible that the author resided in Alexandria and was acquainted with the philosophy of Eudorus. Through integrating ideas from Hellenistic Astronomy and Medicine, he modernised the natural philosophy of Plato's Timaeus.
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    Published 8 months ago
    Thales of Miletus

    Thales of Miletus

    Thales of Miletus in Ionia, Asia Minor, was a Greek mathematician, astronomer, and pre-Socratic philosopher from Miletus. He had been one of Greece's Seven Sages. Some, most especially Aristotle, considered him the first philosopher in Greek history, and he is generally traditionally regarded as the first person known to have entertained and participated in scientific philosophy in Western civilization. As a predecessor to modern science, Thales is known for breaking from using myths to describe the earth and the cosmos, and then describing real events and phenomena by theories and hypotheses. While describing reality as deriving from a unity of all based on the presence of a single supreme material, nearly all the other pre-Socratic thinkers preceded him, instead of using mythological explications. Aristotle believed him to be the father of the Ionian School and confirmed Thales 'theory that a single material element was the original concept of existence and the essence of matter: water. In algebra, Thales used geometry to measure pyramid heights and ship's reach from land. He is the first known person to use geometry-applied deductive reasoning by deriving four corollaries from the theorem of Thales. He is the first known person to whom has been credited a mathematical discovery. The dates of Thales 'existence are not entirely known, but a few datable events listed in the sources loosely determine the dates. According to Herodotus, Thales predicted the solar eclipse of May 28, 585 BC. The chronicle of Apollodorus of Athens cites Diogenes Laërtius as saying that Thales died at the age of 78 after the 58th Olympiad and attributed his death to heat exhaustion while attending the games. Thales was presumably born in mid-620s BC in the town of Miletus. Writing during the 2nd century BC, the ancient writer Apollodorus of Athens believed Thales was born in the year 625 BC. In the fifth century BC, Herodotus identified Thales as "a Phoenician by distant descent." Tim Whitmarsh noted that Thales considered water as the primary concern, and his name may have originated from this situation as thal is the Phoenician term for moisture. According to the later historian Diogenes Laërtius, in his third century AD Lives of the Philosophers, quotes Herodotus, Duris, and Democritus, all of whom agree that "Thales was the son of Examyas and Cleobulina, and belongs to the Phoenician Thelidae. Their titles are the Carian and Greek tribal, respectively. Diogenes then notes that "Most authors, however, portray him as a native of Miletus and of a respectable family. However, his supposed mother Cleobulina was also identified as his companion. Diogenes then provides further contradictory reports: one that Thales married and either fathered a son or adopted a nephew of the same name; the other that he never married, saying his mother as you. Plutarch had mentioned this storey earlier: Solon visited Thales and asked him why he stayed single; Thales said he didn't like the thought of having to think about kids. Nevertheless he adopted his nephew Cybisthus many years later, desperate for love. He has been said to be approximately the technical counterpart of a typical option trader. It is thought that Thales visited Egypt at one point in his career, where he studied geometry. Diogenes Laërtius wrote that Thales described the Milesian colonists as Athenian. A novel, with various versions, relates how Thales, through weather forecast, received riches from an olive harvest. In one storey, after forecasting the weather and a good harvest for a given year, he bought all the olive presses in Miletus. Another version of the storey has been clarified by Aristotle that Thales had rented presses at a discount in advance and could rent them out at a high price when demand peaked, despite his forecast of an unusually successful harvest. This first version of the storey would be the first historically known possible development and usage, while the second version would be the first historically documented choice development and use.
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    Published 8 months ago
    Themistius

    Themistius

    The eloquent Euphrades nicknamed Themistius was a statesman, rhetorician, and philosopher. He flourished in the reigns of Constance II, Julian, Jovian, Valens, Gratian, and Theodosius I; and he enjoyed the respect, despite their numerous differences, of all those emperors, and the fact that he was not a Christian. In 355 Constantius submitted himself to the senate, and in 384 he became prefect of Constantinople on the election of Theodosius. Of his numerous works, thirty-three orations, as well as various observations and epitomes of Aristotle's works have come down to us. He was born and taught at Phasis, Paphlagonia. Apart from a brief period in Italy, he lived the remainder of his time in Constantinople. He was the son of Eugene, who was also a distinguished philosopher, and is mentioned in Themistius's prayers more than once. Themistius was trained in philosophy by his father, and he dedicated himself primarily to Aristotle, though he also studied Pythagoreanism and Platonism. Although still a young adult he wrote observations on Aristotle, which were made public without his permission, which earned a high respect for him. He had passed through his childhood in Asia Minor and Syria. He first encountered Constance II when, in the eleventh year of his reign, 347, the emperor visited Ancyra in Galatia, on which time Themistius gave the first of his surviving orations, Peri Philanthropias. He moved to Constantinople not long after, where he taught philosophy for twenty years. He was elected a senator in 355; and the letter persists, in which Constantius introduces him to the Senate and speaks both of Themistius himself and of his father in the best possible words. We do have the prayer of gratitude that Themistius presented to the Constantinople Senate in response to the letter of the emperor early in 356. In 357, in Constantinople's senate, he recited two prayers in memory of Constance, supposed to be delivered to the emperor himself, who was then in Rome. Constantius granted him the privilege of a bronze statue as a reward; and by a decree that still remained, he was promoted to the praetorian rank in 361. Themistius may have served as Constantinople's proconsul in 358–359; he was the last to hold that office, until the title was promoted to urban prefect status. Constantius died in 361; but Themistius undoubtedly maintained the favour, as a scholar and non-Christian, of Julian, who spoke of him as the world's best senator, and the first scholar of his day. The Suda notes that Julian declared Constantinople's Themistius prefect; but this is disproved by Themistius 'speech when he was finally assigned to that office under Theodosius. Shortly before Julian's death in 363, in a letter to Themistius, Themistius delivered a prayer in his memory that no longer remains but is alluded to at some length by Libanius. In 364 he went to meet Jovian at Dadastana, on the frontier of Galatia and Bithynia, as one of the Senate Members, and to grant upon him the Consulate; and on this occasion he gave a prayer which he subsequently reiterated at Constantinople, in which he asserts absolute freedom of faith to follow every religion. In the same year, in the presence of the latter, he gave an oration in Constantinople in memory of Valentinian I and Valens 'accession. His next prayer is addressed to Valens, congratulating him on his June 366 triumph over Procopius, and interceding for some of the rebels; it was delivered in 367. In the next year, in the second campaign of the Gothic War, he followed Valens to the Danube and gave a congratulatory oration on his Quinquennalia, 368, before the emperor at Marcianopolis. His next prayers are to the young Valentinian II on his consulship, 369, and to the Constantinople Council, in the presence of Valens, in memory of the Goths 'unity, 370. On March 28, 373, on the tenth year of his rule, he delivered a congratulatory letter to Valens on the arrival of the Emperor. It was also during Valens 'time in Syria that Themistius delivered an oration to him persuading him to end his persecution of the Catholic community.
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    Published 8 months ago
    Theodorus the Atheist

    Theodorus the Atheist

    Theodorus the Atheist, of Cyrene, was a Cyrenaic school philosopher and one of the well-known philosophers of the ancient time. He lived in Alexandria and Greece before finishing his days in his native Cyrene region. As a Cyrenaic philosopher, he taught that the aim of life was to achieve happiness and escape sorrow, and that wisdom resulted in the former as well as ignorance in the latter. Yet his supposed conservatism was his primary claim to fame. He was generally called the atheist by ancient scholars. Theodorus was a pupil of Aristippus the Younger, the elder's brother and Aristippus, who was more celebrated. He saw a number of philosophers 'lectures beside Aristippus; including Anniceris, and Dionysius the dialectician, Zeno of Citium, and Pyrrho. He was banished from Cyrene, but for what cause it is not stated; and it is from his saying recorded on this occasion, "Men of Cyrene, you do ill in banishing me from Libya to Greece, as well as from being a disciple of Aristippus, that it is inferred that he was a native of Cyrene. There is no related account of his subsequent history; but his anecdotes indicate that he was in Athens. Nevertheless, Demetrius Phalereus 'influence allegedly protected him; and this event will thus possibly be located at Athens, 317–307 BC, within the ten years of Demetrius' rule. Since Theodorus was exiled from Athens and was later in Ptolemy's service in Egypt, it is not unlikely that he joined Demetrius's overthrow and exile. The account cited by Diogenes Laërtius of Amphicrates of Athens, that he was condemned to drink hemlock and so died, is beyond doubt a error. While at Ptolemy's command, Theodorus was sent to Lysimachus on an ambassador, whom he insulted by the expression of his remarks. Several ancient authors praised one reaction he made to a crucifixion challenge that Lysimachus had used. He evidently returned from the Lysimachus court or camp to that of Ptolemy. We also read about his visit to Corinth with a number of his followers, but during his stay in Athens this was probably just a brief visit. He long returned to Cyrene, and stayed there, says Diogenes Laërtius, with Ptolemy's stepson Magas, who ruled Cyrene as viceroy for fifty years, then as king. Theodorus's days at Cyrene presumably ended. Various characteristic anecdotes of Theodorus are preserved from which he appears to have been a man of keen and ready wit. Theodorus was the founder of a church, called Theodoreans after him. Theodorus 'views, as can be learned from Diogenes Laërtius' perplexed comment, were of the Cyrenaic school. He explained that the true end of human life is to attain happiness and escape sorrow, and that wisdom is the former, and ignorance is the latter. He has described the good as prudence and fairness, and the bad as the opposite. Pleasure and pain were nevertheless oblivious. He made fun of friendship and loyalty, and said his country was the universe. He taught that nothing in stealing, treason, or sacrilege was necessarily disgraceful if one defied public opinion, which had been established by fools 'permission. They blamed Theodorus for atheism. He has excluded all views supporting the gods, Laërtius claims, but some opponents question that he was an atheist or merely denying the existence of common religion deities. The accusation of atheism is backed by Atheus 'popular classification, by the authority of Cicero, Laërtius, Pseudo-Plutarch, Sextus Empiricus, and some Christian writers; although others talk of him as denying traditional theology alone. He wrote other works on his sect's teachings as well as on other topics according to the Suda.