Matthew Trundle

Matthew Trundle


How does it work?
  • Matthew Trundle
    Published 2 months ago
    Karen

    Karen

    Tendrils of her hair cling to her cherub face as she
  • Matthew Trundle
    Published 2 months ago
    Unrest

    Unrest

    In the throes of night when the sky is dark and
  • Matthew Trundle
    Published 2 months ago
    A Year in Review

    A Year in Review

    Time is relentless even as it
  • Matthew Trundle
    Published 2 months ago
    ‘Crawl’ Is the Kind of Dumb, Fun Summer B-Movie That Hits Theaters Once in a Blue Moon

    ‘Crawl’ Is the Kind of Dumb, Fun Summer B-Movie That Hits Theaters Once in a Blue Moon

    Arriving to UK cinemas at the end of this summer, Crawl has definitely been released at the right time. This film is undemanding, illogical, and silly—and one of the most enjoyable, guilty-pleasure summer blockbusters in years. Yet, it feels weird that a film like this even made it to the cinema. That's not due to quality-level, of course; this film genuinely surprised a lot of critics with its fun and self-aware take on creature-features that are few and far between these days. Of course, there will always be plenty of Jaws knockoffs—this year has seen a sequel to the unintentionally hilarious 47 Meters Down—but Crawl arrives more in the vein of Snakes on a Plane and Piranha 3D. Crawl is also reasonably well-constructed for a low budget film, with some less-than-desirable CGI, with camera angles and shot types that can manage to shock and surprise audiences so accustomed to mainstream horror. Director Alexandre Aja really plays around with his limited amount of locations, cutting back and forth between a handful of characters, and always keeping plenty of background space in view to keep sequences unpredictable, even when characters’ actions are obvious and, at times, illogical. It’s pretty nifty, and it also knows when not to take itself seriously. Lead actress Kaya Scodelario knows exactly what kind of film she’s in, and delivers some pretty on-the-nose dialogue with glee, even when she’s completely soaked in gallons of rainwater. Everyone just seems to be doing their best to give their audience some horror-film fun, and it makes the film all the better for it.
  • Matthew Trundle
    Published 2 months ago
    Laika’s Films Are Incredibly-Crafted, Thrilling and Charming, Why Are They Faltering at the Box Office?

    Laika’s Films Are Incredibly-Crafted, Thrilling and Charming, Why Are They Faltering at the Box Office?

    After my recent re-watch of Kubo and the Two Strings I wondered how this film could have possibly not won the Oscar for Best Animated Feature, but then you can just look at the list of past winners and it’s apparent that underdogs aren’t likely to succeed to be the eventual winner. Sure, they can be included, and it’s great to see them be recognised as being on the Academy’s radar, but Kubo was the first film to be nominated for both Best Animated Feature and Best Visual Effects, so I thought this would lead to a monumental leap for Laika and they would win their first Oscar. Unfortunately they were stopped by the powerhouse that is Disney because of course they can’t compete with the ultra-powerful monopolising company. I think it’s frankly unfair that Disney is not only dominating the box office but also these award shows with their constant need to buy popular franchises and acquire other studios. It’s concerning to me the amount of power they have over the box office, especially considering their main priority is franchises and remakes, none of which exceed the quality of the originals. Yet they are grossing over a billion dollars apiece so there’s nothing stopping them using this lazy tactic again and again. Fox Searchlight is one of my favourite studios for selecting fantastic independent films for limited or wide release, yet I wonder what their future is going to be like under Disney’s leadership. The Mickey Mouse company clearly struggles with creative directors as discovered with the situation with Phil Lord and Chris Miller who actually beat Disney to the Best Animated Feature Oscar with the outstanding Spider Man: Into the Spider Verse, a film that breaks the mold more than any MCU film. Zootopia is a colourful, well-meaning film, but overall it’s not a particularly striking film, it’s an enormous success probably led to its Oscar, but I still believe that Kubo is the superior film and I wish the Academy would give Laika the exposure and recognition they deserve. There’s reason now more than ever after their latest film The Missing Link is one of the year’s biggest box office bombs, only grossing a quarter of its 100 million dollar budget back, which is terrible for a film that’s charming, beautifully animated, and overall simply delightful.
  • Matthew Trundle
    Published 3 months ago
    20 Years on 'Freaks and Geeks' Remains a Timeless Teen Classic

    20 Years on 'Freaks and Geeks' Remains a Timeless Teen Classic

    With the creative freedom to show practically anything on television, the exploitation of teens in television has caused quite some controversy recently with shows like Euphoria and 13 Reasons Why being very recent examples and have been criticised for their unsubtle takes on sensitive issues in service of cheap melodrama and shock value. It shows the difficulty of bringing a truthful variation of the teen experience onscreen, yet Freaks and Geeks sidesteps shock value situations to instead show this period through character-driven subplots in a touching, humorous manner that has stood the test of time since and is responsible for starting the careers of many successful actors in the show. It’s a shame that the series was cancelled after just one season because these characters are just so easy to warm to and it would’ve been great to see them develop over the course of many seasons but in a way it’s a blessing because the show never declined in quality and can forever remain lightning in a bottle.