Iria Vasquez-Paez

Iria Vasquez-Paez

I have a B.A. in creative writing from San Francisco State. Can people please donate? I'm very low-income. I need to start an escape the Ferengi plan. 

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  • Iria Vasquez-Paez
    Published 6 months ago
    The 14th Amendment

    The 14th Amendment

    The 14th Amendment is a heavy situation to write about. You see, natural citizens are born in the United States. To take away birthright citizenship is to destroy a huge cornerstone of what American law is about. In 1868, a historic decision was made to allow all persons born or naturalized in the United States, including former slaves, to have “equal protection of the laws.” This was the first of three amendments to abolish slavery or so we are told in history class. The Reconstruction era was a time of establishing civil and legal rights for black Americans, as well as becoming the ultimate cornerstone of Supreme Court decisions.
  • Iria Vasquez-Paez
    Published 6 months ago
    The 13th Amendment

    The 13th Amendment

    The 13th Amendment had passed on April 8th, 1864, and then by the House on April 8th, 1865. The 13th Amendment then became about the abolition of forced slavery or labor regarding involuntary servitude except as a punishment for a crime. On December 6th, 1865, the 13th Amendment was ratified. By December 18th, 1865, this amendment had been adopted into the Constitution overall by the states who agreed with the basic weight behind this amendment, to abolish slavery or indentured servitude. After the American Revolution, states had divisions on whether they allowed slavery or not.
  • Iria Vasquez-Paez
    Published 6 months ago
    The 12th Amendment

    The 12th Amendment

    The 12th Amendment to the United States Constitution was first developed on December 9th, 1803, and was thereafter ratified on June 15th, 1804, because it provided new legislation for electing the President and Vice President. Currently, the Electoral College is being reevaluated as a useful part of our government since before the Electoral College was put together, each member cast a single vote. The amendment states that the Electors shall meet in their respective states so as to vote by ballot for President and Vice-President. There is a new consideration given to the fact that the Electoral College must vote a president into office by having 270 votes.
  • Iria Vasquez-Paez
    Published 6 months ago
    The 11th Amendment

    The 11th Amendment

    The 11th Amendment reads as follows: the judicial power of the United States shall not be construed to extend to any suit in law or equity, commenced or prosecuted against one of the United States by citizens of another state, or by citizens or subjects of any foreign state. (Cornell: 11th Amendment) This means that states do not have to hear lawsuits based on federal law. States deal with state law, but individuals can sue states if they want to. Anti-Federalists were opposed to the Constitution itself as well as individual rights to sue a state in federal court. In opposition, the Federalists favored the Constitution, while being eager to see it passed.
  • Iria Vasquez-Paez
    Published 7 months ago
    The 10th Amendment to the Constitution

    The 10th Amendment to the Constitution

    The 10th Amendment reads as follows: “The powers not delegated to the United States by the Constitution, nor prohibited by it to the States, are reserved to the States respectively, or to the people." The Constitution wanted to be specific about the power the Federal government has over the people, as in, the State versus the Feds. The original Constitution that was ratified in 1788 contained few restrictions about the way the Federal government could use its power against the people or for the people since sometimes, major decisions are left to the States even to this day.
  • Iria Vasquez-Paez
    Published 8 months ago
    The 9th Amendment

    The 9th Amendment

    “The enumeration in the Constitution, of certain rights, shall not be construed to deny or disparage others retained by the people,” this is the text of the 9th Amendment. On September 17, 1787 the Anti-Federalists demanded a Bill of Rights be added to the final draft of the Constitution. Federalists felt that a Bill of Rights would give the government too much power. The Anti-Federalists had to be contrarian and were against ratification of the Bill of Rights. Fascism means that the government has the right to do whatever they wanted, so the Anti-Federalists were paranoid that having too many rights would lead to this.