DNQ

DNQ

Hi, my name is Dean Quach. I'm a student going to San Diego State University and I major in Computer Science. I love playing video games, work out, hang our with friends and family, and make YouTube Videos.

http://youtube.com/deanquach

  • DNQ
    Published 2 months ago
    Yeamans' Impact to U.S. History

    Yeamans' Impact to U.S. History

    Back when slavery became part of the economy, slave owners and traders used plantations to trade resources using the Atlantic Trade System. During the 16th to the 18th century, the Trans-Atlantic Slave Trade was a triangular trading system between Africa, Europe, and North America where slaves were used to help develop plantations such as sugar, cotton, and tobacco in order to export them as resources through the Atlantic Ocean to other countries for more profit, production and increased labor. Bristol was one of the known countries in the British colonies for their long history of trading during the 14th to the 19th century. It was considered one of the main trading ports between other colonies such as North America and Africa during the Atlantic Slave Trade. Sir Robert Yeamans, one of the merchants in Bristol, was a well known merchant who took charge in taking over the expansion of trading during the late 16th century as a sheriff and as a counselor. Scholars say that Sir Robert Yeamans was one who worked with other merchants in secrecy. However, Yeamans made an impact on U.S. history because of trade and his connection to his family. His expansion of trade benefits the increase of trade during the Trans-Atlantic trade during the 18th century.
  • DNQ
    Published 2 months ago
    Media Framing in 2020

    Media Framing in 2020

    Media framing is a concept in various media that depicts how the culture of society is defined in the social class. Diana Kendall, a professor at Baylor University, studied how the media has portrayed social class. Her non-fiction book Framing Class: Media Representations of Wealth and Poverty in America was released in July 2005 and was reprinted by the Rowman & Littlefield Publishers in 2011. In her study, “Framing Class, Vicarious Living and Conspicuous Consumption,” she discusses how different types of framing depict each social class rank and why the media doesn’t differentiate between real and fake. Her main claim is that media framing tends to depict social classes and exaggerates the ideology that people tend to overanalyze other social classes in our American society. She believes that the solution to media framing is journalism. She proves her claim by showing the differences between various classes in a cultural perspective, and that the social classes don’t reflect or mirror society as a whole. A movie that relates to some of the framing concepts is Crazy Rich Asians (2018), a story about a Chinese-American woman, Rachel Chu, who visits Singapore for the first time with her boyfriend, Nick Young, only to learn that his family is unbelievably rich and very well known. As Rachel learns about his family, she finds out that she is the target of Nick’s rarefied family culture because she is different. In this paper, I will analyze and discuss Diana Kendall’s main argument, its strengths and weaknesses, and analyze the movie, Crazy Rich Asians, discussing how it relates to one of her framing concepts in the overall argument.
  • DNQ
    Published 2 months ago
    Why Is The Elite College System is Unfair?

    Why Is The Elite College System is Unfair?

    Education in our society is focused on development and what it means to be taught in schools that set our future into stone. William Deresiewicz, an essayist, believes that there is an issue in today’s society and culture. His article, “Don't Send Your Kid to the Ivy League”, was published in the New Republic in 2014. He talks about the weakness of the elite college system and how its weakness can affect the many students within the system. The elite college system is the prestigious system with prep courses, and tutors in private or public schools that enforce students to take the route of the elite admission process. Deresiewicz assumes that students are really smart and knowledgeable enough to understand the curriculum of college, but in reality, it just leads to a dead end for a student’s success. His main claim is that the elite college system creates an inequality between students because it allows students with high skill levels and acknowledgement to be admitted into the elite college system, it affects the success of the students and their development as individuals. Deresiewicz follows up with his claim and reasonings to show that education should be equal and a right to all citizens in the social classes. However, there are those who agree that education, in public schools, isn’t equal and that it affects the way society is shaped. In this paper, I will be analyzing William Deresiewicz’s argument through his reasonings, his use of strategies, and how his argument connects to other authors who have a similar position.
  • DNQ
    Published 2 months ago
    My Take On Ozymandias

    My Take On Ozymandias

    The meaning of power, within Ozymandias, is someone who possesses authority and a great social structure which lasts for a long time. Ozymandias, by Percy Shelly, is a poem about a king who was known to be “the best of the best.” He was the one who had a lot of power but overtime lost a lot of power and almost became nothing. Although he had a statue, there was almost nothing left but the legs and the hip. Throughout the poem, we can see that the idea of power can be considered as something that’s misused, temporary, and forgotten.
  • DNQ
    Published 3 months ago
    My Private Life
  • DNQ
    Published 4 months ago
    How do stories affect our lives?

    How do stories affect our lives?

    Stories are told like legends or memories that occur to us as we spread our views to others, even if the story is about ourselves. Todd May, a political philosopher and professor, writes his essay based on how society affects us in a particular way. In his New York Times article, “The Stories We Tell Ourselves” May writes about how stories have a meaningful value in our daily lives. He claims that stories have value to what we say about ourselves but most people are not acknowledging their true selves when they tell their stories. He often refers to a term called “echo chamber” which is basically a lot of ideals parroted back at us to make our stories seem believable. May uses personal anecdotes and hypothetical situations to support his central claim that we aren’t the people we say we are.