Devin Scully

Devin Scully

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  • Devin Scully
    Published 3 years ago
    The Conservative Case for Minimum Income

    The Conservative Case for Minimum Income

    Minimum income programs, also known as a negative income tax, mincome (Forget, 2011), have long been considered a left wing or socialist proposal, and on the surface they are; using taxpayer dollars to subsidize the income of lower earning individuals is undeniably a form of wealth redistribution. By that logic, many conservatives would naturally oppose negative income tax programs, and in fact, many do. But what if a minimum income tax actually saved the government money while doing a better job to help those in need than existing social assistance programs? If we could find a way for fewer tax dollars spent on needless bureaucracy, every Tory should be on board. Not only does negative income tax provide a significantly higher standard of living province wide, it bolsters the provincial economy by decreasing government waste and keeping Ontario competitive. Conservatives across Ontario should embrace negative income tax, allowing for the removal or prevention of no fewer than five costly government programs. Ontario Disability Support Program (ODSP), Ontario Works (OW), Affordable Housing and Homelessness Prevention Programs, as well as Legal Aid cost in excess of seven billion dollars in 2010-11 (Ministry of Finance, 2010), with small budgeted increases since then. The proposed Ontario Registered Pension Plan can also be eliminated with a negative income tax. The poverty line is a figure which can be debated (Sarlo, 2013); however, for the sake of discussion we will assume a negative income tax top up to $20,000, which is roughly the generally accepted poverty line in Ontario.