Dani Buckley

Dani Buckley

My life revolves around horror and film.

How does it work?
  • Dani Buckley
    Published 2 months ago
    The Best of Peter O'Toole

    The Best of Peter O'Toole

    Nominated for no less than eight Academy Awards without winning a single one, it is undoubted that O'Toole stands alongside the ilk of actors wrongly snubbed for a lifetime of outstanding performances. Like Burton, Harris and Sharif, O'Toole set the bar in the 1960s for the next generation of actors.
  • Dani Buckley
    Published 2 months ago
    10 of Brad Pitt's Best Roles

    10 of Brad Pitt's Best Roles

    Anyone who knows me knows I am a massively unashamed Brad Pitt fan. Not only because he's something of an Adonis, but also because he is a strikingly good actor. Don't get it twisted: he's not just a beautiful face. In fact, he recently collected his first acting Academy Award for Best Supporting Actor in February of this year, an accolade which was, admittedly, long overdue. Having followed Pitt's career since my early teens, I wanted to celebrate his win by compiling a list of ten of his best roles, from 'Kalifornia' to 'Ad Astra'.
  • Dani Buckley
    Published 2 months ago
    PAUSE: Unearthing 'The Blood on Satan's Claw' (1971)

    PAUSE: Unearthing 'The Blood on Satan's Claw' (1971)

    Set during the uncertain times of pastoral early eighteenth century England, this period piece is folk horror at its finest. Often grouped in the same vein as 'The Wicker Man' (1973) and 'Witchfinder General' (1968), 'The Blood on Satan's Claw' packs a particularly memorable punch for those who have seen it. And its seeds of eeriness have been sewn in recent horror creations, such as 'A Field in England' (2013) and 'The VVitch' (2015). Despite this, 'The Blood on Satan's Claw' exists primarily these days as a movie dwelling mostly in cult status, with few testaments to its hidden brilliance. This is unfortunate, because, against the unfavourable odds of its low budget and aging special effects, 'TBOSC' is one of the few horror films to have truly unnerved me as of late.
  • Dani Buckley
    Published 2 months ago
    PAUSE: A Look Back at Andrzej Zulawski's 'Possession' (1981)

    PAUSE: A Look Back at Andrzej Zulawski's 'Possession' (1981)

    Mimicked just a few years ago by Massive Attack in their video for 'Voodoo in my Blood', which starred a brilliant but frantic Rosamund Pike undergoing a Satanic attack in a subway, 'Possession' is a film that exists without a great buzz. This is a shame, because it is as deserving of as much praise as any blockbuster horror we've grown to revere nowadays, and contains one of the greatest onscreen performances, I personally, have ever witnessed.
  • Dani Buckley
    Published 2 months ago
    The Best of Laura Dern

    The Best of Laura Dern

    It's safe to say that 2019 was a year in the film industry that belonged to Laura Dern. Starring in two of the most highly-praised films of the year, Dern proved to the world why she continues to be a titan in the acting business and schooling the children in how best to represent strong female characters onscreen. Winning an Oscar on her birthday for her portrayal of no-bullshit lawyer Nora Fanshaw in Noah Baumbach's moving flick 'Marriage Story', Dern's academy award success was deserved, but long overdue.
  • Dani Buckley
    Published 2 months ago
    PAUSE: A Closer Look at Bergman's 'Hour of the Wolf' (1968)

    PAUSE: A Closer Look at Bergman's 'Hour of the Wolf' (1968)

    Many have heralded Bergman’s films ‘The Seventh Seal’ and 'Persona' for their unflinching look at dark, subjective themes like mentality, death, belief and sexuality. However, there is one film that is seemingly left trailing in the wake of these titans by viewers and critics alike. Exploring the theme of isolation, both mental and physical, as well as other Bergman-esque themes, 'Hour of the Wolf' is nothing short of a forgotten masterpiece. While it is ambiguous, muddled and at times, hard to follow, the film is an enthralling depiction of one man's spiral into madness, and the ineptitude of his wife in knowing how to save him. 'Hour of the Wolf'' has brilliance in its ambiguity; the dream-like feeling of the film adds to the sense of one's sanity crumbling at the foundations. Its imagery, dialogue and cinematography are dazzling in their gloomy, melancholic brilliance.