Alice Fernyhough

Alice Fernyhough

A lesbian concerned with media depictions of the LGBT community. Often writes about cartoons, likely to write about cats.

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  • Alice Fernyhough
    Published about a year ago
    Harry Potter: The Boy Who Would Not Die

    Harry Potter: The Boy Who Would Not Die

    As with many people my age, I grew up reading the Harry Potter series as each new installation was released. They were my first full-length novels, and I saw the films as soon as they were released in cinemas. It was something for which I lived and breathed, boring my family endlessly by simply listing facts. By the time the eighth and final film, Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows: Part Two was released, J.K. Rowling's magnum opus was worth millions in its seven books, eight films, and supplementary video games and materials. Following this, most people thought it was over—and then Pottermorecame along. Pottermore was a kind of interactive encyclopedia to supplement the novels with visual aids and extra information—though most people used it for the quizzes. Pottermore was a nice idea, though incomplete upon its release. The information was usually interesting and the quizzes were a lot of fun. In 2016, we were met with a two-part stage play, Harry Potter and the Cursed Child, and a film, Fantastic Beasts and Where to Find Them. As of 2018, Fantastic Beasts and Where to Find them has a sequel, Fantastic Beasts and Where to Find them: The Crimes of Grindelwald. It is apparent, then, that the Harry Potter series shows no signs of stopping, and this is no good thing. J.K. Rowling's biggest talent, it seems, is to amass evidence of her own lack of awareness through her poor writing, lack of research, and illogical use of social media platform, Twitter. Her own brand of discrimination, disguised as soggy ally ship, is supplemented by bad creative practice and writing which has served to continually destabilise her first seven novels.
  • Alice Fernyhough
    Published 2 years ago
    Luna Lovegood Should Have Been a Lesbian

    Luna Lovegood Should Have Been a Lesbian

    In Harry Potter and the Order of the Phoenix, the fifth installation in the Harry Potter series, J.K. Rowling introduced Luna Lovegood. Many readers were instantly infatuated by her quirky and often whimsical quips and characterisations, viewing her as a tribute to the weird. However, Rowling went on to sell readers short on two accounts: she failed to address Luna's clear neurodivergence, and she lazily paired up Luna with the never-before-seen Rolf Scamander in an afterword to the series. If lesbian readers did not deserve outward confirmation of Luna's lesbian status, they at least deserved not to have this identification dashed. Luna's "otherness" is reflected in literary tradition surrounding lesbians, her social experiences in the isolation many lesbians experience, and her political interests in the methods employed by the lesbian community to invoke social change.
  • Alice Fernyhough
    Published 2 years ago
    Things Writers Need to Know About Mental Illness

    Things Writers Need to Know About Mental Illness

    Though novelists and screenwriters have undeniably made great leaps in their understanding of mental health since the Bronte sisters' depictions of undefined "madness" back in the Victorian era, plenty of progress is yet to be made. Writers still fall back on stereotypes in droves, or else completely neglect to acknowledge that they are writing about an illness. Even when this is not the case, management and recovery of mental health issues are rarely explored. This reflects directly on people with mental illnesses, and it does not help them.
  • Alice Fernyhough
    Published 2 years ago
    Doki Doki Literature Club's Meta-Narrative

    Doki Doki Literature Club's Meta-Narrative

    On the 22nd of December 2017, long after the birth of the visual novel and even longer after the birth of interactive fiction, video game platform Steam debuted Team Salvato's much acclaimed Doki Doki Literature Club. Doki Doki Literature Club is perhaps a spiritual successor to Adam Cadre's 1998 Photopia, offering 'choices' amidst a linear narrative to create a commentary on fiction - a meta-narrative. However, Doki Doki Literature Club has access to the 2017 technologies that Photopia did not - and in using them creates a far more chilling narrative.